Friday, October 24, 2014

Disaster Strikes in Threes

Melinda Palacio
The calm after the storm

So the saying goes, disasters strike in threes. After I fell down the stairs and broke my leg, I wanted to count those two events as disasters two and three. Number one was earlier this year when our house was broken into. The good news on that was I had nothing to take. The burglars made a mess of the house, overturning drawers, taking out every box, stuffed into my closet. The rascals tore open a pretty envelope that I was saving to use when the mood struck me to surprise someone with old fashioned postal mail. I was even offended when the thieves didn't take any of my jewelry, opting instead to throw earrings and bracelets to the floor. However, what they did take was a jar of quarters. Somewhere, dirty thieves needed to do laundry. I hope they feel good about themselves in their clean clothes.

The work of messy thieves.

So the break-in and my broken leg counted as numbers one and two. Fate would not allow me to count the surgery as number three. The proverbial third shoe finally dropped three weeks ago when a broken washing machine caused the house to flood. A fifty-cent plumbing part nearly destroyed the house. Luckily, we have flood insurance which will cover the cost of the demolition (now finished) and restoration. As with my million dollar leg, a fall that resulted in a giant medical bill, I am very fortunate to have health insurance and flood insurance.
What used to be the kitchen. Walls, floors and ceiling flooded.


The good news is that the house will be even better than it was before and we will be able to get rid of the carpet on the stairs that caused me to slip and break my leg. Perspective is key here. After having been rushed to the emergency room with a dislocated ankle, my foot facing the wrong way, and a broken fibula, most other disasters like the house flooding, the ceiling caving in the kitchen, complete with sink, cabinets, and appliance, walls and floors needing to be demolished and rebuilt, doesn't seem that horrible. I'm able to continue writing. There are two rooms in the house that were unaffected. And luckily, I had my laptop with me and was not in the house when the disaster happened.
My million dollar leg
I spent the entire summer in the bed office due to my broken leg and I get to spend the next couple of months there again due to a near total house flood and forced remodel.

My leg is healing well, although it will be another couple of months until I am up and running, or dancing. In writing news, I took Rudy's challenge and entered the William Faulkner WisdomCompetition, I made it to the final round in Poetry. Congratulations to winner Claire Dixon. Entering poetry competitions is sobering and challenging, but it's nice to be recognized for work that has already been published. Last week, Nicole Thompson featured me in Latin Post.

Blas Falconer, Melinda Palacio, Michelle Detorie after the Mission Poetry Series reading.


A highlight of this summer was reading in the Mission Poetry Series with Blas Falconer and Michelle Detorie. The September day was gorgeous. With perfect weather on one of the last days for tourism in Santa Barbara, along with a street closed by the Sol Food Festival, the audience could have been sparse, but instead we had a crowd eager for poetry. As my friend reminds me, It could've been worse. 

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Pat Mora talks to La Bloga

Pat Mora
 
LYDIA GIL:  How has your work as a poet shaped your writing for children?

PAT MORA:  Wonderful question! I believe there can be a close connection   between writing evocatively for children and writing evocative poetry. Both invite the writer to compress and to play with language(s).

LG: Día has been a phenomenal success across the US; what were your expectations when you first proposed it?

PM: I smile at your statement. I feel Día, has so, so far to go to reach its full and necessary impact. My dream, as I've been stating the last few years, is now that Annual April Día celebrations (often on or near April 30th) become as firm a tradition as Mother's Day and Father's Day. I want to stress that Día is a daily commitment, día por día, and that it celebrates not only the importance of literacy but also the wonder of children. In 2016, we'll celebrate Día's 20th Anniversary.


LG:  How do you respond to the claims of a lack of diversity in children's writing today?

PM: It's a fact. According to the census bureau, about a quarter of students in U.S. public schools are Hispanics/Latinos. In 2013, of the more than 3,000 children's books published in this country, 57 were about Latinos, 48 by them. Yes, we need to speak to publishers, reviewers, etc., and we need to work with educators and librarians to purchase and enthusiastically share books written and illustrated by culturally diverse authors and illustrators, BUT we also need to be an active part of the solution. We need to buy and give and share those books. Publishing is a business, and we need a nation of readers.

LG: What is the role of bilingualism in your writing? 

PM: I grew up in a bilingual home and have always been bilingual. Since my educational and professional experience has been primarily in English, I am English dominant. I feel blessed, however, to be bilingual and to be able to think and speak and write in both languages.


LG: Could you comment on the process and experience of writing with your daughter?  How many books have you written together? 

PM: Writing with my daughter Libby Martinez, a lawyer by training, was great, great fun. We've published two books together, and we laughed and laughed on the phone working on both. Libby is an excellent writer and is very creative. Publishing children's books is becoming more and more challenging for many reasons. I so hope that Libby finds success and joy in this work.


LG: What would you say is your biggest responsibility when writing for children?

PM: I'm smiling again. Certainly I feel a responsibility to be inventive and to do my very best to create a poem or book that will in some way delight my young readers for whom I have so much respect. They are our future readers--and our future.  



The National Poetry Series
is pleased to announce the winner of the 2014 Paz Prize for Poetry:

Nueve Monedas by Carlos Pintado from Miami Beach, Florida
Chosen by Richard Blanco, to be published by Akashic Books


Honorable Mention: Un enigma esas munecas
by Lourdes Vázquez of Miami, Florida
 

 ¡Felicidades!

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Mi Familia Calaca/ My Skeleton Family



Review by Ariadna Sánchez
Día de los Muertos or Day of the Death is approaching. In preparation for this amazing festivity, reading Mi Familia Calaca/ My Skeleton Family by Cynthia Weill in collaboration with Oaxacan paper mache artisan Jesús Canseco Zárate is a great way to start the celebration.
Weill’s latest bilingual book gives a glance of the vast Mexican art. Anita is a young calaca girl, who introduces each member of her skeleton family.  With short and catching sentences in English and Spanish, each character reveals its beauty to the young readers. Each page shows a colorful encounter starting with Anita’s brother Miguel (el travieso/the brat), followed by her cute baby brother Juanito, then her stylish mother, next her handsome father, as well as her adorable grandparents, and last but not least her cat and dog. 
The astonishing art created by Canseco Zárate pops-out automatically like jack-in-the-box. The wonderful sculptures in paper mache are a pleasure for the senses.
Mi Familia Calaca/ My Skeleton Family is a must read for the season. Reading gives you wings. Visit your local library to check out more exciting stories.
For additional information about Cynthia Weill’s books and artisan Jesús Canseco Zárate’s calacas click on the following links:




***

Latino/a Rising is the first collection of U.S. Latino/a science fiction, fantasy, and other speculative genres.


There is a growing movement of people who are interested in the incredible U.S. Latino/a writers and artists who have turned to science fiction, fantasy, and other speculative genres. Latino/a Rising: An Anthology of U.S. Latino/a Speculative Fictionwill introduce the public to the work of these writers and artists.

With the exception of Edward James Olmos’ Bladerunner and Battlestar Galactica, positive U.S. Latino/a characters have been largely absent from mainstream speculative fiction novels and films. Films such as Men in Black and Alien Nation, and shows such as X-Files, express the anxiety that the mainstream has concerning Latinos/as and recent immigrants.  Latino/a Rising will contest this trend, showing how Latino/a writers and artists are transforming the genres.

Please support this project  

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Magulandia lands in Santa Paula • 10,000 Strong Veterans

Michael Sedano


Magu. When Magu died his many friends grieved his absence because he was so vital and so young and so alive. You can't miss him, though, because sabes que? Magu lives. There's Magu photo-bombing Eloy Torrez, resisting the urge to make rabbit ears. Always liked a good laugh, Magu did.

The legendary artist, Gilbert Magu Lujan, is all over the walls in Santa Paula's Art Museum where In Search of Magulandia, this year's 21st De Colores Art Show, opened last Saturday, October 18 and will run through February 22, 2015.

The Santa Paula Art Museum occupies a solidly built 1920's two-story building in the heart of a scenic valley where agriculture and oil helped form a town that is finding community through culture. The Limoneira Building was Union Oil Co's founding Hq.

Museum Executive Director Jennifer Heighton worked with Curators Xavier Montes and Vanessa Acosta to mount the dual shows. A companion exhibit opened at the city's Agricultural Museum, a restored railroad warehouse where Los Fabulocos performed and the Magu-painted Family Car was surrounded by superb exemplars of Magu's sculpture and paintings.

At the Art Museum, the 1950 Chevy coupe with the FAMCAR license, together with Mario Trillo’s delivery van, greeted visitors at the side entry, where shade added to the welcome on the open sky Spring-like afternoon. Danzantes opened the doors at two in the afternoon and the place soon rocked with gente taking in the tributes to el maestro.

Jennifer Heighton beamed as she passed among the throngs moving about the gallery, posing for fotos with artists and one another. Angel Guerrero and Sergio Hernandez showed portraiture while Paty Diaz (with daughter Leylany Rodriguez) and Manuel Unzueta created symbolic references to Magu's love for cars.



There are some precious gems among the work on display. All endeavor tributes to Magu’s iconography. Artists paint trokitas, pyramidal dogs, indigenous motifs, color, smiles. They attempt to capture Magu's attitude; he painted with disarming innocence that takes a big bite out of comfortable ideas and perspectives.

The show brings together dozens of Magu's friends and running mates, also in the show artists who knew Magu, artists who studied Chicano Art and knew of Magu. The work includes variety from pastiche to portrait to allusion to school-of tributes. The artists speak in acts of friendship and love for Magu, his art, and what Magu championed. It is an altogether invigorating and encouraging exhibition.

There's always something. I missed a knee-high wood sculpture set on the floor beside a support beam--a couple of times--and in the crowd couldn’t bend to study it when I noticed it.

Spirit-infused artists showed up to make the opening a distinguished gathering. This particular group knows how to have fun. Oscar Castillo and Mario Trillo captured images. Pola Lopez and Victoria Plata relaxed with the Family Car. David Botello shared fine points of the giclée Manuel Urrutia bought in the gift store. Urrutia did what visitors need to do more of when visiting museums, buy stuff. Mario Trillo photo bombs David and Manuel.


A museum visitor's friend captures a moment with J. Michael Walker, whose piece is obscured by the phone. Walker's stunning work merits such widespread acclaim that one day this visitor's relatives will want copies of the foto he's snapping. Be sure to click on the links to individual artist webpages, like this one for Michael's.



Pola Lopez tells a rich story of her first meeting Magu. They knew of one another by reputation and their work. Pola had constructed a work featuring the Family Car in a landscape populated by feminist symbology. Entitled Not a Hood Ornament. Magu was apprehensive she was calling him on the carpet.

Lopez'work is an appreciation. Magu learns this and Pola and he become lifelong friends. Pola's narrative of creating this tribute to her first Magu encounter will have visitors triply engaged with Pola's wonderful kiss, Magu's smile, and the artist's expressiveness. Peace Offering lettered down the left edge shares their history while also remembering her friend, qepd. 

Pola Lopez and her work


Museum Executive Director Jennifer Heighton beams delightedly when spotted circulating through the lively crowd who pack the gallery. The turn-out for the show is historic. Gente galore wander in and about the red-brick walls, enjoying the ambience, the food and beverage, the plein aire style found in side galleries where gulp-prices on large paintings give one pause. It's discover day for many, their first visit to town.

The large crowd mills about the big room until they begin claiming chairs for the presentations. Magu's son, Otoño, will be playing later with el Conjunto Los Pochos. All the Magu kids, and their mom, have come to celebrate Magulandia with his friends. 

Vanessa Acosta sparkles with excitement and indefatigable energy reserves. She and museum staff and Xavier Montes have worked months inviting, receiving, hanging, making arrangements. Here now, then gone in sixty microseconds, Acosta may have discovered teleportation. The museum publishes a beautiful full-color glossy commemorative pamphlet. Santa Paula Museum of Art does things first class for Magu and his friends.

Vanessa Acosta

Big X, as Montes is called, gives free music lessons to local kids--Jarocho to Beatles but mostly musica--through Strings of De Colores, a museum-sponsored non-profit. Details at the link on donations and mailing address for non-card donors.

Montes conducts the music with fervor and the musicians perform with puro ganas. Calling out the chord, he sings as well as coaches them through an able and extended performance. These kids are wonderful music makers. Performances like these will eventually coax out the dollars to help the museum wire the place for sound.

As X collapses in joy and exhaustion with the concluding notes, one of the Angels on Harps leaps from her instrument and claims victory of kids over loving music teacher. He challenged them to make all that practice pay off and it was Carnegie Hall day in their home town art museum. They all triumphed today.

Musicianship and heart



video


Museum Executive Director Jennifer Heighton, David Botello with Botello's Magulandia painting. Exquisite in detail and symbol, Botello's portrayal would be extra fabulous adorning one of those big walls downtown, or at the Smithsonian. Docents would spend hours pointing out the history and significance Botello places onto the canvas. It, along with Family Car, one day will be in the Smithsonian. Heighton can claim art world bragging rights on having launched the wall.


The Agricultural Museum waited after a pleasant stroll passing an old Moreton Bay fig, crossing the railroad tracks and a route step march along the tidy tracks to the pea gravel then the door.

Magu's own work hangs in a corner of the huge space. Collectors owning quintessential Magus shared freely with curators Montes and Acosta. Free-standing sculpture on display encourages 360 degree appreciation of Magu's clay and corrugated work. Seeing these seminal works together is seeing the beginnings of Chicana Chicano art.

Here In Search of Magulandia allows gente to get up close to Family Car unimpeded by barrier tape and stanchions. People were respectful of the finish and kept proper distance. It is a show of generosity and respect for this audience.

Paul Dunlap enjoys sharing the 1950 Chevy Coupe Magu painted. They were friends. Dunlap, back to camera, treats the car like the gem it is. He trucks Family Car to wherever he shows it. He drives it low and slow from the Art Museum to its place of honor in the museum. Sadly, La Bloga did not photograph the car wheeling on the street.

Santa Paula Art Museum hosts the main show through February. Travelers heading to El Lay from Fresno and parts north can detour from the 5 via Highway 126. Travelers to and from Santa Barbara will delight in the detour up the 126 from Ventura to Santa Paula, then the canyon road to Ojai, back to Ventura.

Leaving the Agricultural Museum and Magulandia, sharp-eyed witnesses watched a velocipede cruise past the Moreton Bay Fig tree, followed at a proper distance by a lass who didn't dare display any ankle  as she pedaled along the dusky road.

Getting to Santa Paula is its own adventure. Go. See the show. Add value to the journey by joining the museum. You can renew that membership every year; this trip through Magulandia happens only this once. Through February 2015.
c/s





Los Angeles
Veterans Job Hopes Gain 10,000 Possibilities

Magu was proud to be Veteran of the United States Air Force. Veterans everywhere welcome any effort with genuine possibilities for meaningful full time work.




Time runs short to apply for the October 28 deadline to get in on this Los Angeles program. Click this link for details.

Monday, October 20, 2014

NACCS Midwest Focus: Latin@s in the Midwest: Past, Present, and Future in Kansas City


Xánath Caraza



From October 23 – 25, 2014 in Kansas City, the Latina/Latino Studies Program (LLS), University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) will host and organize the NACCS Midwest Focus: Latin@s in the Midwest: Past, Present, and Future. The conference theme-Latin@s in the Midwest: Past, Present, and Future–recognizes the rich historical and growing presence of Latin@s in this region. Our goal is to promote awareness and further develop knowledge and analysis of historic, current, and future developments that impact the Latin@ population.

Keynote Presenters:

Dr. Alberto Pulido: “Everything Comes from the Streets” Documentary on Lowrider Culture

Dr. Rogelio Saenz: “Demographics: Latinos in the Midwest”

Dr. Rusty Barcelo: “Navigating Our Midwest Latina/o Journey in Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities for the Future”.

Latina/Latino Studies Program at UMKC

The mission of Latina/Latino Studies (LLS), a program based in the College of Arts and Sciences, is to function as a vehicle for interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teaching, research and outreach focusing on Latinas/os-Chicanas/os in the U. S. The LLS program will provide an awareness and understanding of the wide diversity of Latino communities, cultures and backgrounds. The development and expansion of our curricula will serve to empower our students with the concepts and skills to better understand a rapidly growing Latina/o population. The LLS program will engage students, scholars and the greater Kansas City community in collaborative projects, programs and service learning efforts. These efforts will foster new curricula and advance research and outreach scholarship to create new knowledge to better understand the cultural, economic, and historical experiences and contributions of U. S. Latinas/os-Chicanas/os and their diasporic origins.

EL PROGRAMA

THURSDAY OCTOBER 23, 2014


4:30-6:00                 REGISTRATION –STUDENT UNION THEATER FOYER

5:30-                                      WELCOME

Leo Morton, Chancellor 

Miguel Carranza, Latina/Latino Studies

Theresa Torres, NACCS

Juan Betancourt, ALAS

6:00               Introduction to the Video:  Everything Comes from the Streets

7:00               Question / Answer Session with Alberto Pulido, Director and Co-Producer and Rigo Reyes, Co-Producer

7:30               RECEPTION                                                  SU THEATER FOYER

Low Rider Car Display                                 Administration Bldg Parking Lot – Cherry Street        

FRIDAY OCTOBER 24, 2014

9:00—5:00   REGISTRATION STUDENT UNION (SU) THEATER FOYER


10:00-11:30       CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Session 1.1          Moderator:                                                                                                        Room Bloch 211

ROUNDTABLE: Gustavo Carlo, Sarah Killoren Francisco Palermo Katharine Zeiders and Cara Streit

TITLE:  Socializing Agents and Experiences Associated with Latino/a Children and Youth Well-being

Session 1.2  Moderator:  Viviana Grieco                                                                                 Room Bloch #212

ROUNDTABLE: Valerie Mendoza, María Torrez Anderson, Fatima Rodríguez Al-Makhim, Christina

Valdivia-Alcalá

TITLE: Chicana Testimonios: Growing up Chicana in Kansas, Three  Generations of Experience

Session 1.3 Moderator: Morgan                McMichen                                                          Room Bloch 213

ROUNDTABLE:  María Vásquez Boyd, José Faus, Miguel Morales

TITLE: The Latino Writers Collective: Creating and Sustaining a Community of Writers, Advocates, and Educators

Session 1.4 Moderator: Erica Hernandez Scott                                                                    Room SU 302

WORKSHOP: Judy Ancel and Saira Gordillo

TITLE: They Just Cut Our Program’s Budget. Now What Do We Do?

11:30-12:00                 POSTER SESSION                   SU Theater Foyer

Victoria Santiago & Claritsa Santiago

TITLE: ESL Misconceptions: Making a Good Program Even Stronger.

Jessica Rodas

TITLE: An Evaluation of Organizations in Kansas City in Improving the Health of the Latino/Hispanic Community.

Joseph Salazar and Idaima

TITLE: Assessing Obesity of Latino Children in Southwest Kansas via Ventanilla de Salud para Niños

12:00-1:00 LUNCH           

1:00-1:30  POSTER SESSION                                      SU Theater Foyer

1:30-3:00                     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 2


Session 2.1 Moderator: DJ Ferman                                                                                           Room Bloch 211

ROUNDTABLE:  April Bermudez & Matthew García

TITLE: (dis)Placed Ecologies, (dis)Placed Communities: Social Art Practice and the Homeland


Session 2.2 Moderator: Jessica Rodas                                                                                     Room Bloch 212

ROUNDTABLE: Patricia Alvarez-McHatton, Dea Bermudez-Marx, and Erica Hernandez-Scott

TITLE: Maestras: Past, Present, and Future


Session 2.3  Moderator: Morgan McMichen                                                                        Room Bloch 213

READING: Xanath Caraza, Natalia Treviño and Minerva Margarita Villarreal

TITLE: La Poetry en el Midwest y en México: Chicanas/Mexicanas con Ganas


Session 2.4  Moderator: Jorge Palomares                                                                              SGA Chambers/SU

ROUNDTABLE:   Moises Orozco, Eduardo Coronel, Daniel Muñoz, Jonathan Mendoza, Wendy Ramírez, Angeles Rivera-Centeno, Alberto Jimenez

TITLE:  Meaningful Connections between Latina/o students at a Community College in Illinois

Session 2.5          Moderator: Vanessa Aguilar                                                       Room SU 302

TITLE:  Researching Women and Gender in the Midwest

Linda Garcia Merchant: Five Layers Of Performance Art: Creating the Films, ‘An Evening with La Tess”
 

Andres Lazaro Lopez:  A Conceptual Note on Latino Professionals: The Future of Latina/O Scholarship On Paid Labor

Kandace Creel Falcón: Railroad Settlement Narratives: Invisibility And Chicana Feminist Interpretations Of Mexican Women’s Representations in Early 20th Century Kansas

BREAK

3:15-4:45                     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 3

Session 3.1          Moderator: Norma Cantu                                                                            Room Bloch 211

Panel: Gloria Anzaldúa

Visnja Vujin:  Gloria Anzaldúa’s Female Borderland Identities in Sandra Cisneros’ Fiction

Sarah Becker: Beyond Borderlands: Spiritual Mining and the Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa Papers, 1943-2004

Norma E. Cantú, Vanessa Aguilar Maritza Fernandez: Researching Latina Traditional Culture in Kansas City: An Anzaldúa Third Space feminist Approach


Session 3.2  Moderator: Patrica A. McHatton                                                                       Room Bloch 212

ROUNDTABLE: Randy López, Jackie Madrigal

TITLE:  ¿Qué hiciste en la escuela hoy?: How High Schools Can Make Meaningful Connections with Spanish-Speaking Households and Get Them College-Ready


Session 3.3  Moderator: Morgan McMichen                                                                        Room Bloch 213

ROUNDTABLE/READING:  Elizabeth Martinez, Xanath Caraza, Andres Rodríguez

TITLE: Gathering Words: A Special issue of Diálogo


Session 3.4          Moderator: Amelia Montes                                                                        Room SU 302

Panel:  Brown Mujeres Navigating Predominantly White Midwest Spaces

Belinda Acosta:  Brown Body: White Faces: The Brown Female Body as Authority Figure in The Predominantly White Classroom

Bernice Oliva: Naming The Whole World A Borderland: Performance of the Teacher Self

Amelia Montes: Directing an Ethnic Studies Program in the Midwest: Challenges and Successes

4:45-5:00                                              BREAK

5:00-5:30     FEATURED SESSION                                                                      SU Theater

 POETRY READING BY MINERVA MARGARITA VILLARREAL

5:30-  Plenary Talk                                                                                                SU Theater

Dr. Rogelio Sáenz, Dean, College of Public Policy, University of Texas at San Antonio

Title:  Latinos and the Changing Demography of the Heartland: Implications for the Future of the Midwest

7:30        RECEPTION                                                                                                                         SU THEATER FOYER

SATURDAY OCTOBER 25, 2014

8:00—11:00       REGISTRATION—                  STUDENT UNION FOYER

8:30 A.M.            BUSINESS MEETING                                           SU Theater

9:00-10:30          CONCURRENT SESSIONS 4

Session 4.1      Moderator: Jessica Rodas                                                                   Bloch 218

Panel: Education Matters

 Heather Hathaway Miranda: ¡Sí Se Pudo! ¿Sí Se Pudo? Latina/Latino Student Activists in The 1990s

Hannah K. Noel:  Developing a Responsible Pedagogy

Uzziel Pecina: Leadership for English-Language-Learner Programs: Uniting Policies, Practices, and Parents to Support Secondary Students

Session 4.2 Moderator: Alice R.                                                                                                                 Bloch 213

Panel:  Chicana Studies at Kansas State University

Yolanda Broyles-González:

TITLE:  Jenni Rivera Enacting Mujerismo (Womanism): Change And Continuity Of The Oral Tradition

Isabel Millá

TITLE:   Engineering Chicana Heroism In Border Dystopian Sci-Fi Film

Norma A. Valenzuela

TITLE:  The Evolution Of A Transnational Imaginary In United States Latina Drama: Mujeres In Search Of “Home”


Session 4.3 Moderator: Alberto Villalmandos                                                                                      Bloch 324

READING:  Miguel M. Morales, Ruben Quesada, Joseph Salazar

TITLE:  Queridos: Midwestern Gay Latino Poets


Session 4.4. Moderator: Theresa Torres                                                                                                                SU 302

WORKSHOP:  José García

TITLE:  West Side Chronicles - City Life Chicano Style


Session 4.5 Moderator:                                                                                                                                 SGA Chambers

ROUNDTABLE: Gabriela Díaz Sabates and Marcelo Sabates

TITLE:  Reshaping the Multicultural Landscape at a Midwestern University

10:30  BREAK

10:45        CLOSING PLENARY

Dr. Nancy “Rusty” Barceló, President, Northern New Mexico College

TITLE:  Navigating our Midwest Latin@ Journey in Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities for the Future


In Other News


Reyna Grande in Kansas City, University of Missouri-Kansas City



Norma Cantú, Reyna Grande and Xánath Caraza
 


Las Esmeraldas, ESU

Gregory Robinson, Ph. D., Xanath Caraza, Kevin Rabas, Ph. D., ESU


During my keynote at Emporia State University


 

University of North Georgia: “Exploring Linguistic Diversity among Latinas”, October 7 – 8

Univesity of North Georgia, Dahlonega Campus, lunch with LASO
After lunch with Alvaro Torres, Ph. D. and Maria Guadalupe Calatayud, Ph. D. with LASO students 

University of North Georgia, Dahlonega Campus


University of North Georgia, Gainesville Campus, LSA




Festival del Libro y la Palabra, Acapulco en su Tinta 2014, October 9 – 11 


Before my poetry presentation
My poem "Frente al mar"


Poets Chistian Peña, León Guillermo Gutiérrez and Xánath Caraza


Poets and authors, Nadia Villafuerte, Ángel Vargas, Xánath Caraza, Beatriz Pérez, León Guillermo Gutiérrez, Juan Mireles, Luis Zapata and Luis Armenta Malpica