Wednesday, May 05, 2010

IN MEMORIAM—Rose Treviño

Authors, illustrators, readers, advocates for Latino literature, and book lovers of all sorts have suffered a great loss. Rose Treviño, Youth Services Coordinator for the Houston Public Library, passed away on Friday. Rose was a dear friend and someone I truly admired. She was the type of person who would not hesitate to offer a helping hand, and was willing to introduce you to the right people to ensure your sucess, as she understood that one person's success in this field, signifies a success for the field as a whole. She worked tirelessly to make a difference and knew how to get things done. I consider myself lucky to have known her. Below, I have included a link to an interview I conducted with Rose some time ago for Críticas magazine. Anyone interested in Latino publishing should read this interview to become aware of the amazing work librarians do everyday to promote our books. My heart and thoughts go out to her family, and to everyone who had the pleasure of knowing Rose and is as saddened by this loss as I am. Feel free to comment below if you are so inclined.—Adriana

http://www.criticasmagazine.com/article/CA6605985.html?industryid=48434

René Has Two Last Names/René tiene dos apellidos won a 2010 Skipping Stones Honor Award 

 


Press Release

Each year we recognize outstanding books and teaching resources with our Annual Skipping Stones Honor Awards. The honored books promote an under- standing of cultures, cultivate cooperation and encourage a deeper understanding of the world’s diversity, ecological richness, respect for multiple viewpoints and close relationships within human societies. Bound to provide a great reading adventure, our selection offers a variety of learning experiences for readers of all ages.

The winners are presented in three categories—Nature Books, Multicultural Books and Teaching Resources. Thanks to our many reviewers from diverse backgrounds for helping us select these 25 titles. At Skipping Stones we believe good books offer an affordable and exciting way to explore and understand cultures, places, societies and their histories. Welcome to the wonderful world of words!

COMPLETE LIST

Multicultural & International Awareness Books:

First Come The Zebra by Lynne Barasch, illustr. Lynne Barasch.

A Lion’s Mane by Navjot Kaur, illustr. Jaspreet Sandhu.

Anh’s Anger by Gail Silver, illustr. Christiane Krömer.

Big Bear Hug by Nicholas Oldland, illustr. Nicholas Oldland. 

Rocks Not Happy In Sacks by Gilbert Walking Bull and Sally Moore, illustr. Tom Novak.

Finding Lincoln by Ann Malaspina, illustr. Colin Bootman. 

Nasreen’s Secret School by Jeanette Winter, illustr. Jeanette Winter. 

For a Girl Becoming by Joy Harjo, illustr. Mercedes McDonald.

The Land of Expression by David & Mutiya Vision, illustr. Ignacio Alcantara.

René Has Two Last Names/René tiene dos apellidos by René Colato Lainez, illustr. Fabiola Graullera Ramírez. 

Muchacho by Louanne Johnson. 

Libertad by Alma Fullerton.

Half Spoon of Rice by Icy Smith, illustr. Sopaul Nhem. 

Mao and Me:The Little Red Guard by Chen Jiang Hong. 

My Name Is Henry Bibb:A Story of Slavery and Freedom by Afua Cooper. 

Children of War:Voices of Iraqi Refugees by Deborah Ellis. 

Wanting Mor by Rukhsana Khan. 

Simeon’s Story: An Eyewitness Account of the Kidnapping of Emmett Till by Simeon Wright and Herb Boyd.

Nature and Ecology Books:

In the Trees, Honey Bees by Lori Mortensen, illustr. Cris Arbo.

Where else in the Wild? More Camouflaged Creatures Concealed...and Revealed by David M. Schwartz and Yael Schy, photos by Dwight Kuhn.

Waste: Science Q&A Series by Melanie Ostopowich.

Discover the Desert: The Driest Place on Earth by Kathy Ceceri, illustr. Samuel Carbaugh.

The Man who Flies with Birds by Carole GarbunyVogel andYossi Leshem.

Teaching and Parenting Resources:

Rethinking Multicultural Education: Teaching for Racial and Cultural Justice, ed.Wayne Au.

What’s on Your Plate? A DVD by Catherine Gund, Sadie Hope-Gund and Safiyah Riddle.

1 comment:

KarlaXD said...

Para la familia Valdez.
El fallecimiento de Rose Treviño significa una gran perdida. Fueron pocos los momentos que convivimos con ella, pero es poco tiempo fue suficiente para darnos cuenta del gran ser humano que ella fue.
Rose la vamos a extrañar y vivira eternamente en nuestros corazones.

~Familia Valdez